Equality and Diversity

Equality and Diversity Statement

 

Article 2 (Non-discrimination): The Convention applies to all children, whatever their race, religion or abilities; whatever they think or say, whatever type of family they come from. It doesn’t matter where children live, what language they speak, what their parents do, whether they are boys or girls, what their culture is, whether they have a disability or whether they are rich or poor. No child should be treated unfairly on any basis.

At Coombeshead Academy we believe that every young person should have the opportunity to learn in a stimulating and inspirational environment where they can be challenged at the highest levels, as well supported and nurtured, to achieve their very best.

Our core values of Achievement, Attitude, Community, Endeavour and Enrichment underpin all our decisions and interactions with students and families.

As part of the UNICEF Right Respecting Schools programme, we actively endorse the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Convention says what countries must do so that all children grow as healthy as possible, can learn at school, are protected, have their views listened to, and are treated fairly.

We are committed to providing equality of opportunity for all pupils and staff (Article 2), and to providing a working environment which is free from discrimination, prejudice and harassment. We encourage respect and consideration for others, and recognise and value the school as a safe place for learning, where children are treated with dignity (Article 28). The staff at Coombeshead Academy recognise that inequalities exist in all levels of society and believe that, as educators, we have a crucial role to play in eliminating racism, sexism and all forms of discrimination (Article 36).

We will promote equality by dealing with bullying, racial abuse and sexism immediately and by educating the young people in our care without prejudice.

Unicef

Article 3 (Best interests of the child): The best interests of children must be the primary concern in making decisions that may affect them. All adults should do what is best for children. When adults make decisions, they should think about how their decisions will affect children. This particularly applies to budget, policy and law makers.

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×